by: Kiah Armstrong,

Job :

Update:

(ABC4) – If you’re tired of looking at the old furniture you bought last year at IKEA, the retailer has announced that it will now pay customers to bring back the old furniture.

The IKEA buy-back and resell option is now available for 37 of its stores in the United States. To help pave the way for a sustainable lifestyle, the company has brought back the initiative that was launched at the end of last year.

How it works?

You start by filling out a form on The IKEA website to receive an estimate of the redemption value of your furniture by email. Customers are asked to bring a copy of their quote, buy-back number and fully assembled furniture to your participating IKEA store where an employee will assess the buy-back value of the furniture.

When you redeem, you’ll get store credit and your furniture will get a second life in the As Is department.

What are the redemption conditions?

According to IKEA, the following product categories are currently not eligible for the furniture buyback service:

  • Non-IKEA products
  • Furnishing accessories, including lighting and textiles
  • Additional units and components
  • Products that have been used outdoors, including outdoor furniture
  • Mattresses and poor textiles (such as blankets and mattress toppers)
  • Kitchens including worktops, cabinets and fronts
  • Modular cabinets and accessories
  • Electrical appliances and products
  • chests of drawers
  • “Pirate”, Modified or Painted Products
  • Unassembled products
  • Market Hall products (including small kitchen items, art, rugs and picture frames)
  • Upholstered or leather products
  • Sofas or armchairs
  • Plants
  • Articles containing glass (including mirrors)
  • Products for children and babies (such as cribs, mattresses and changing tables)
  • Beds and box springs

The retailer said on its website that large quantities and items for commercial use are exempt.

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